Search

THE WESTWOOD DIGEST

Writing by Emma Westwood. Most likely about movies, monsters, cinematic events and other wild trips. Words should go down nice and easy.

THE FLY book is now available

Want to buy THE FLY book? It’s currently available here:
 
 
Read more books. It’s sexy 📚
Advertisements
Featured post

I am writing a new book: BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

At my recent book launch, I had the pleasure of making an announcement: I’m writing a new book – another film monograph – on an extraordinary cinematic milestone, James Whale’s BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN from 1935.

The book will be written for Neil Snowdon’s Electric Dreamhouse Midnight Movie Monographs series and it will join other excellent titles such as Martin by Jez Winship, Spirits of the Dead (Histoires Extraordinaire) by Tim Lucas and my other favourite David Cronenberg film, The Brood by Stephen R. Bissette.

While research is underway, BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is slated for release in 2020/21, which might sound like an eternity away but will be here before you can say, ‘She’s alive! She’s alive!’ (and don’t forget my book on THE FLY is now available).

Here’s a teaser of what to expect with BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN…

more-button

William Castle Vol. 2: New DVD audio commentary

This beautiful volume of William Castle films, produced by Indicator/Powerhouse Films in the UK, is quite the sight to behold. It follows the Vol. 1 release of The Tingler, 13 Ghosts, Homicidal and Mr Sardonicus, and it features a mindboggling selection of extras created by brilliant people that I love – Kat Ellinger, Samm Deighan and Lee Gambin, to name a few. I did a commentary duet with Lee on one of my favourite William Castle films, Strait-Jacket. To say I’m proud as punch is an understatement.

more-button

Journal Launch: If I Only Had a Brain

When Lee Gambin said he was creating a regular, themed journal as part of his Cinemaniacs film collective, I had no idea it would be this impressive (and this big – around 200 pages). But, Lee has managed to do it once again, and I’m proud as punch to be in the flagship edition on ‘Scarecrows in Cinema’.

My contribution is the rather thorny subject of the Jeepers Creepers franchise.

Anyone in Melbourne is more than welcome to join us at the launch of the journal on Saturday 10th November at Grub Street Bookshop where copies will be on-sale. I will be attending, although I cannot confirm an appearance by Lee’s canine son, Buddy, who is modelling the journal in this photo.

I will be posting more details of where you can get it shortly.

Book Launch: THE FLY and ROLLERBALL

Yes, this is happening…

What: Andrew Nette and Emma Westwood invite you to the launch of their new cinema books on ROLLERBALL and THE FLY
When: Sunday 4th November @ 4.30pm
Where: Grub Street Bookshop, 379 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia
RSVP: andrewnette@gmail.com and emma@emmawestwood.net

💋

Sesame Street’s Pinball Number Count

After watching the excellent documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, about US children’s television producer and presenter, Fred Rogers, I’ve felt compelled to reshare a mini memoir I wrote for the website Stereo Stories a few years ago. It’s an ode to Sesame Street, in particular, the musical genius of Walt Kraemer.

Sesame Street’s Pinball Number Count

The electronic babysitter had fulltime employment at our place. Married in 1971 at the age of 17 – with the shotgun firing behind her – my mother was the one who needed the babysitting. She’d gone from a household of six to the solitary confines of a flat, so the box acted as a constantly yammering family of a different kind, even if she wasn’t paying attention to it most of the time.

As the progeny of this pop-cultural upbringing, I followed my mother’s lead and took up a cross-legged position approximately three feet away from the television most afternoons. The routine went something like this: Playschool (for the sake of it), Doctor Who (for the love it) and then, scheduled in-between those two programmes, Sesame Street.

I adored Sesame Street. Rather than gravitate to the familiar, I was romanced by its differentness to my suburban Australian reality – the urban decay of its ‘70s New York City setting; the ethnicity of the regulars with their Hispanic names, flares and large ‘fros; and the cast of misfits including a misanthrope, Oscar the Grouch, who lived in a rubbish bin (or ‘trash can’ as Sesame Street taught me, not to forget the pronunciation of the letter ‘zee’ that earned me a slap on the wrist from my primary school teacher – “But Miss, if I say ‘zed’ then it doesn’t rhyme with the rest of the ABC song!”).

And then there was the music.

Continue reading “Sesame Street’s Pinball Number Count”

The Act of Seeing

I’m chuffed, to say the least, that Screen Education has chosen my piece, The Act of Seeing: Cinema, Ethics and Responsibility, as one of the feature articles on their website for edition No. 91 of the magazine.

This was a mind-twister of an article and, given the breadth of subject matter, I enlisted a number of expert interviewees to put forward their opinions. Huge thanks to Matthew Beard, Steve Thomas, Stuart Richards and Alexandra Heller-Nicholas for lending their voices to this ongoing debate. Their contributions have helped make this particular article a work of which I can be very proud.

‘The Act of Seeing’ also functions as a partner piece to my previous article, ‘To Watch or Not to Watch, That is the Question’, examining similar ethical considerations on watching cinema but from a different angle, which you can read online at Diabolique.

I urge you to subscribe to Screen or purchase a copy so you can share in the many other insightful film articles this edition has to offer.

The great southern creature feature

Once upon a time, in the summer of 2017, I wrote a story for Metro called ‘The Great Southern Creature Feature’ that used the release of the independent monster movie, Red Billabong, as a launching pad to talk about Australia’s proclivity for eco-horror.

While I was contractually unable to share this story with you until now, I’d like to point out that this particular edition of Metro is still available for purchase online, where you can enjoy this story (and many more) in all its colourful, printed glory.

Otherwise, here’s a plain text version for your reading pleasure… Continue reading “The great southern creature feature”

KOTCH: New DVD audio commentary

One of the most amazing minds in film commentary, Lee Gambin, has invited me to join him behind the mic to create a commentary track for a new DVD release from Kino Lorber of the 1971 film, KOTCH.

Starring Walter Matthau in an Oscar-nominated role, KOTCH is the one and only film directed by Jack Lemmon but it is the second DVD commentary by Lee and myself. What is the first one? That’s still under wraps.

Keep your eyes (and ears) peeled for more…

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑